WOWI® Sample Career Report

Wyatt Wowi

Report Date: 04 February 2019

Education: High school diploma or equivalent

Career Training Potentials
Go to CTP ›
Job Satisfaction Indicators
Go to JSI ›
Career Interest Activities
Go to CIA ›

The WOWI® is comprised of three sections. The careers that fit you best are a combination of all these dimensions. The ideal job will be interesting to you, it will utilize and expand on your abilities, and the work environment will fit with your personality.

Career Training Potentials

The career training potentials are the single most powerful predictor of job success. Your motivation to develop aptitudes significantly beyond your current performance level depends on whether you can make a clear connection between improving performance and appealing future education and career opportunities. The following results are based on the assumption that you answered questions in these areas honestly and to the very best of your ability.

Verbal

Ability to read and comprehend words.

Are effective communication skills required for your career goals?

Your vocabulary is good and you probably do well at communicating your ideas, whether orally or in written form. This will be an asset to you in obtaining the jobs you wish to pursue. You also have the potential to increase your vocabulary and communication skills, if you find this to be an asset for your career or educational goals.

“Communication - the human connection - is the key to personal and career success.”
— Paul J. Meyer

Numerical

Ability to manipulate the language of numbers. Indicates understanding and skill in performing basic mathematical functions.

Is understanding and performing mathematical functions required for your career goals?

If you are considering occupations that require advanced mathematical and statistical skills, it is important to see where you stand with basic math. Your score suggests you’ve learned and retained your current level of math knowledge when you saw a use for it. When it seemed irrelevant to your goals or unnecessary, you may not have been motivated to learn or retain that information. However, you have the potential to improve your math skills, if you find this to be an asset to you in your career or educational goals.

“Let's face it; by and large math is not easy, but that's what makes it so rewarding when you conquer a problem, and reach new heights of understanding.”
— Danica McKellar

Abstractions

Potential in the area of figuring out problems through a logical procedure. It measures the ability to solve problems by means of size, position, shape or quantity without assistance from words or numbers.

Is the ability to solve complex conceptual and theoretical problems required for your career or educational goals?

If you are considering an occupation that requires this ability, it would be helpful to know if you generally prefer to solve more concrete, technical problems or those that require a more conceptual, theoretical approach. Your score suggests you generally prefer to use a mix of technical and conceptual problem solving to deal with the obstacles that confront you. You may especially like learning about and applying the more theoretical approaches when they can be used to solve the most difficult problems that you face.

“We must prepare people to be nimble enough to adapt to an ever-evolving marketplace. And we must help them develop skills that will be valued no matter what tomorrow's jobs are - skills like creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaboration.”
— Tae Yoo

Spatial-Form

Ability to visualize and think in three dimensions. Ability to formulate a finished product from seeing the visual plans. Potential to sense forms and positions of things in space.

Is the ability to visualize 2D diagrams as 3D objects required for your career goals?

If you are considering an occupation that requires this ability, it would be helpful to know how you visualize. Some people can easily visualize two dimensional images or objects in three dimensions and some people use technology to do this for them. Your score suggests you probably are able to naturally and easily visualize two dimensional images and objects in three dimensions. In addition, you are likely to be capable of accurately estimating aspects such as size, space, distance and volume, without requiring the aid of measurement instruments. You therefore have the capacity to excel at visualizing blueprints, designing floor plans, navigating, or any other activity requiring a high degree of skill in spatial-form perception. Though the use of 3D computer tools and models might be useful, you do not require these aids to see these things in your "mind’s eye".

Consideration

Spatial-Form perception develops early in one's life and is generally stable during a person’s adult life.

“In my mind's eye, I visualize how a particular… sight and feeling will appear on a print. If it excites me, there is a good chance it will make a good photograph. It is an intuitive sense, an ability that comes from a lot of practice.”
— Ansel Adams

Mechanical/ Electrical

Potential to construct, operate and repair machinery and understand physical forces. Also includes the influence of prior knowledge and understanding of electricity, electronics and electromagnetics.

Is understanding technology, machinery or electricity required for your occupational goals?

If you are considering an occupation that requires this ability, it would be helpful to know if you generally want to work on technology or have technology work for you. Your score suggests you like a combination. At times you probably prefer user-friendly technology and want to have a technician fix machines when they break down. At other times you are probably comfortable using new devices and technologies which require using your knowledge to set them up or even troubleshoot them.

“Even though I didn't make it to the moon, my machines did.”
— Albert Hibbs

Organizing Skill

Potential to perceive and utilize language and numbers in a specified way. Ability to concentrate and perform sequential reasoning using alpha and numeric symbols.

Is the ability to logically structure information required for your occupational or educational goals?

If you are considering an occupation that requires this ability, it would be helpful to know how you organize. Some people can easily organize information in a structured, logical format that is clear and understandable to others. Some people prefer to have others do it for them. Your score suggests you are good at logically organizing information in a format to be understandable to others. Furthermore, you are probably good at note taking, writing reports, and editing papers.

“The more we can organize, find and manage information, the more effectively we can function in our modern world.”
— Vint Cerf

 

Job Satisfaction Indicators

An occupation that matches your personality and work style is likely to make you feel more comfortable and engaged, which leads to greater job satisfaction. It is important to note that these indicators reflect preferences only, and not skills or abilities.

Versatile & Adaptable to Repetitive Work

Your score suggests

Variety is the spice of life for people like you. You clearly prefer being versatile on the job, but can handle a little repetition when necessary. Your ideal work environment will have structure, guidelines and boundaries but also flexibility within those boundaries.

What it measures

Versatile is how much you like variety and change in your job and the number of tasks or projects you like going on at the same time.

Adaptable to Repetitive Work is how much time you like to spend on each project or task and the extent to which you need your work to have a high degree of predictability and structure.

Adaptable to Performing Under Specific Instructions

Your score suggests

You do not mind working under specific instructions, but do not want to have a manager or supervisor always checking your work. You can function well without a manager most of the time, but occasionally you will want to check with someone or have some way to make sure that you are on the right track.

What it measures

How much you like working under strict policies, procedures, guidelines and supervision.

Dominant

Your score suggests

You would enjoy occupations in which you plan, direct, control the work of others, or in which you are independent, self-motivated and resourceful. You should avoid jobs where you can never plan your own work or where you would never have the opportunity to supervise or manage others.

What it measures

Preference for planning, controlling, and organizing the work of others. Or, being resourceful, independent, self-directed or decisive on the job. It may indicate a desire to be the manager, foreman, or supervisor.

Gregarious & Isolative

Your score suggests

You have no preference for working with people or for working alone during the course of the workday. You would be most comfortable working with others part of the day and working alone the rest of the day. You should avoid positions that demand you work either exclusively with people or exclusively alone.

What it measures

These two scales should be considered together.

Gregarious is the extent to which working with other people is perceived as being conducive to a positive work environment.

Isolative looks at preferences for working alone, without interruption.

Influencing

Your score suggests

When it comes to conflict and debate on the job, you pick and choose which battles to fight, jumping into the fray only when an issue seems important enough. On the other hand, when you disagree with a decision, statement or policy, if it's really no big deal, you can easily let it slide. You should probably avoid high-conflict or ultra-competitive environments.

What it measures

How much you like to debate, discuss, persuade, convince, and even argue with others.

Self-Controlled

Your score suggests

You can handle occasional crises and deadlines on the job, but you also need periods of down time and quiet in which to recover. High-stress or high-risk jobs such as air traffic controller, fireman, or emergency room technician might be a little too much to suit your style. Even less obvious stresses such as a constant stream of disgruntled customers might also push you to the limit. When considering occupations, look for balance and avoid the extremes.

What it measures

How much you find deadlines or high stress situations motivating in your work environment.

Valuative & Objective

Your score suggests

You like using facts, information, and data in your work, and do not mind using hunches and intuition once you understand the facts. You will not enjoy work that requires you entirely to rely on intuition or hunches to make your decisions.

What it measures

Valuative is enjoying making decisions based on hunches, intuition, and feelings about a situation as it is occurring.

Objective is prefering to base decisions on facts, data, and information that can be verified.

Subjective

Your score suggests

You do not feel the need to express yourself in your work, but will not be opposed to being creative if your position demands it of you occasionally. You will probably find it difficult to come up with a constant flow of creative ideas, but you will feel just as frustrated if you never are asked to use your creativity or imagination. The most satisfying positions for you will require some subjectivity, but you will not want it to be the most important aspect of your job.

What it measures

How much you like being creative, self-expressive or artistic on the job.

Rigorous

Your score suggests

You like being rigorous on the job, and will feel comfortable with checking your work and following rules and regulations. If you find yourself in a job where rigorousness is not valued, you may discover that your co-workers consider you to be overly meticulous or rigid.

What it measures

How much an individual likes paying close attention to details.

Career Interest Activities

The Career Interest Activities (CIAs) reflect your preferences for specific, work-related tasks. Your highest measured CIAs, along with your Self-Selected Occupational Choices and Best Liked Subjects, provide the foundation for your specific career recommendations.

Every job requires people to work with Data, People, and Things, in varying degrees. Most people are primarily motivated by one or two of these (and on rare occasion, all three).

You are motivated by working with

Data & Things

You are motivated in your job to work with information in designing tangible products.

Career Recommendations

The occupations recommended to you are based on your scores in all completed sections of the inventory. We encourage you to explore your career possibilities to the fullest extent. Just because a job is recommended does not mean it will be a perfect fit. It only means there is a better than average chance you will enjoy the occupation and find it interesting. It is important to understand that these results cannot guarantee your success; adequate education, job search skills and hard work go hand-in-hand with success in acquiring and retaining a job.

O*NET in-it
Occupations   EducationProgram of StudyO*NETExplore More
Dispatcher, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulancegreen leaf iconJob Specific QualificationsOn-the-job Training43-5032.00My Next Move website
Cargo and Freight Agentbright outlook iconJob Specific QualificationsOn-the-job Training43-5011.00My Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
New Accounts ClerkHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-4141.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Insurance Policy Processing Clerkbright outlook iconHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-9041.02OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Freight Forwarderbright outlook icongreen leaf iconHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-5011.01My Next Move website
Office Clerk, Generalbright outlook iconHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-9061.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerkgreen leaf iconHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-5071.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
TellerHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-3071.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Payroll and Timekeeping ClerkHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-3051.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Billing, Cost, and Rate Clerkbright outlook iconHigh School Diploma or equivalentOn-the-job Training43-3021.02OOH websiteMy Next Move website
You may also want to explore the following careers which require further education/training
Occupations   EducationProgram of StudyO*NETExplore More
Electrical DrafterScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconCertificate after High SchoolElectrical/Electronic Drafting17-3012.02OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Robotics Techniciangreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconCertificate or Associate's DegreeRobotics or Industrial Technology17-3024.01OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Computer User Support Specialistbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconCertificate or Associate's DegreeComputer Specialist15-1151.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Electro-Mechanical Techniciangreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconCertificate or Associate's DegreeMechanical Engineering17-3024.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Legal SecretaryAssociate's DegreeLegal Administration43-6012.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Electromechanical Engineering Technologistgreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's DegreeMechanical Engineering17-3029.03My Next Move website
Executive Secretary and Administrative AssistantAssociate's DegreeOffice Administration43-6011.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Industrial Engineering Technologistgreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's DegreeIndustrial Technology17-3029.05My Next Move website
Surveying Technicianbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's DegreeSurveying Technology or Geomatics Technology17-3031.01OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Medical Secretarybright outlook iconAssociate's DegreeMedical Administration or Health Information Technology43-6013.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Mechanical DrafterScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's DegreeMechanical Drafting17-3013.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Medical Records and Health Information Technicianbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's DegreeHealth Information Management29-2071.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Computer OperatorAssociate's DegreeComputer Science43-9011.00My Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Graphic DesignerAssociate's or Bachelor's DegreeGraphic Design27-1024.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Web Developerbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's or Bachelor's DegreeComputer Science15-1134.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Mapping Technicianbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconAssociate's or Bachelor's DegreeGeomatics, Geospatial Technology, or Surveying Technology17-3031.02OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Mechatronics Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeMechatronics Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology17-2199.05My Next Move website
Manufacturing Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeManufacturing Engineering17-2199.04OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Robotics Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeRobotics Engineering17-2199.08My Next Move website
Validation Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeElectrical or Mechanical Engineering, or Computer Science17-2199.02My Next Move website
Mechanical Engineering Technologistgreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeMechanical Engineering17-3029.07My Next Move website
Wind Energy Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeCivil Engineering17-2199.10My Next Move website
Computer Systems Engineer/ArchitectScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeElectrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, or Informational Technology15-1199.02My Next Move website
Electronics Engineer, Except Computergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeEngineering17-2072.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Database Administratorbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeComputer Science15-1141.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Multi-Media Artist and Animatorbright outlook iconBachelor's DegreeFine Arts, Computer Graphics, or Animation27-1014.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Network and Computer Systems AdministratorScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeComputer Science or Information Science15-1142.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Software Developer, Systems Softwarebright outlook icongreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeComputer Science15-1133.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Software Developer, Applicationsbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeComputer Science or Information Science15-1132.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Statistical AssistantBachelor's DegreeMathematics or Statistics43-9111.00My Next Move website
Computer Network ArchitectScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeComputer Science or Information Systems15-1143.00OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Nuclear Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeNuclear Engineering17-2161.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video
Marine Engineerbright outlook iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeMarine Engineering17-2121.01OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Fire-Prevention and Protection EngineerScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeFire Protection Engineering17-2111.02OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Water/Wastewater Engineergreen leaf iconScience, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) iconBachelor's DegreeCivil Engineering17-2081.01OOH websiteMy Next Move website
Archivistbright outlook iconBachelor's or Master's DegreeArt, History, Library Science, or Archival Science25-4011.00OOH websiteMy Next Move websiteCareerOneStop video

The career recommendations listed above are suggested for your career exploration. If you have access to the Internet, you may want to reference the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/) to learn more about occupationals of interest. The OOH describes careers and includes information on earnings, training requirements and expected job prospects. For more information, go to O*NET OnLine (https://www.onetonline.org/) and enter the occupation or code in the Occupation Quick Search.

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